The ISS Foundation is pleased to annouce that a Ferrous Metallurgy Grant has been awarded to Prof. Harvey Abramowitz, Purdue University, Calumet. The award will consist of a $50,000 annual grant for each of three consecutive years and the designation of the awardee as an Iron & Steel Society Professor for the duration of the grant.

The objective of the Ferrous Metallurgy Grant is to provide financial support for undergraduate university programs which will attract young professionals to pursue careers in the iron and steel industry. Applicants must be involved in teaching activities which are directly or closely related to ferrous metallurgy, preferably be in the early years of their teaching careers, and be members of the ISS.

Programs currently in progress, and those which are concluding, have been productive and of outstanding quality benefitting the universities, students and industry.

The Foundation seeks to attract young people to the industry by promoting the high-tech, diverse and well-paying nature of careers in modern steelmaking.
When and Why was the Foundation Created?
In 1981, the Iron & Steel Society launched the Foundation in recognition of the long-term significance of attracting new and more technologically oriented generations to the world of steel.
Who Owns the ISS Foundation?
In many ways, the ISS Foundation belongs to the steel community. Officially, it is a Pennsylvania-based, 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation that is part of the Iron & Steel Society, an international professional and technical society of more than 8,500 members. A Board of Trustees composed of industry executives and noted academic leaders manages the Foundation’s affairs.
WHAT DOES THE FOUNDATION DO?
From the melt shop to the finishing stands, today’s iron and steel professionals face challenges that were unforeseen merely a decade ago. And tomorrow promises to bring even greater challenges. The ISS Foundation’s programs support the development of professionals who are prepared to meet these challenges.

he Foundation seeks to attract young people to the industry by promoting the high-tech, diverse and well-paying nature of careers in modern steelmaking.
When and Why was the Foundation Created?In 1981, the Iron & Steel Society launched the Foundation in recognition of the long-term significance of attracting new and more technologically oriented generations to the world of steel.
Who Owns the ISS Foundation?In many ways, the ISS Foundation belongs to the steel community. Officially, it is a Pennsylvania-based, 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation that is part of the Iron & Steel Society, an international professional and technical society of more than 8,500 members. A Board of Trustees composed of industry executives and noted academic leaders manages the Foundation’s affairs.
WHAT DOES THE FOUNDATION DO?
From the melt shop to the finishing stands, today’s iron and steel professionals face challenges that were unforeseen merely a decade ago. And tomorrow promises to bring even greater challenges. The ISS Foundation’s programs support the development of professionals who are prepared to meet these challenges.

The Iron & Steel Society is a professional and technical society that provides opportunities for networking among iron and steel industry professionals and advances technology by facilitating information exchange. The Society’s international network of more than 8,500 members includes professionals who work at all levels in the manufacturing, processing, research, supplier and academic sectors of the iron and steel community.

In 1974 the Seed is Planted

While the ISS was officially born on December 1, 1974, its origin can be traced back almost 87 years. According to the first issue of Iron & Steelmaker magazine in December 1974, the Iron and Steel Committee of what now is the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, Inc. (AIME) was formed on April 26, 1912. (AIME itself was founded in 1871.) The mission of this new committee was to represent the interests of AIME in the mining and metallurgy of iron and steel and to secure papers and discussions of iron and steel for meetings of the institute

Over the next 25 years, the interest in iron and steel continued to flourish, and on February 22, 1928, the organization of the Iron and Steel Division was authorized. An excerpt from the minutes of that meeting also appeared in the first issue of Iron & Steelmaker, which said, “It is believed that the organization of the Division has served to arouse the interest and enthusiasm of a large proportion of the iron and steel membership of the institute and that a steady increase in the membership and activities of the Division should result. The outcome will depend largely upon efforts of the individual technical committees.”